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Full text of "Southeast News, Southeast Conference, United Church of Christ, November 1981"

VOLUME 32 



Southeast News 

Published by the Southeast Conference 
United Church of Christ 



NOVEMBER, 1981 



NUMBER 9 



Resurrection 
In China 

The church is alive and well in the 
People's Republic of China! So says Dr. 
David Stowe, executive vice president of 
the United Church Board for World Minis- 
tries, after a recent visit to China with a 
group of UCC pastors and lay people. He 
reports: 
—1 million Protestants, a third more 

than at the time of the 1949 revolution; 
—100 churches open and full; 
—a reopened Protestant seminary with a 

freshman class of 19 women and 30 men 

chosen from 1100 applicants. 

In Hangzhou Dr. Stowe and the Ameri- 
can group attended a standing-room only 
Sunday service at the Protestant church. 
Parishioners must arrive an hour early to 
be assured of a seat. At least a third of the 
congregation are young people, including 
a number of soldiers. In Shanghai one 
Protestant church borrowed $31,000 for a 
complete overhaul of its building. Other- 
wise, the 1200 members meet all church 
operating expenses from the weekly offer- 
ing. 

Five years ago, says Dr. Stowe, Chinese 
church leaders told him the future of 
Christianity in their country looks bleak. 
"What we are seeing today," he says, "is 
nothing short of a miracle! " 



Insurance Company 

Studies Religious 

Commitment 

Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany has left the industry routine to 
examine in depth the impact on American 
life of religion and morality, and concludes 
that it is the level of our religious commit- 
ment which, in the early part of the '80's, is 
a stronger determinant of our values than 
whether we are rich or poor, young or old, 
male or female, black or white, liberal or 
conservative. 

"The influence of religious belief per- 
vades our activities in the home, the com- 
munity and the workplace, as well as our 
attitudes on social and political issues," 

[Continued on Page 4 J 



The Christmas Fund 

For The VETERANS Of THE CROSS And The EMERGENCY FUND 



DO JUSTLY, 
LOVE MERCY, 
AND WALK HUMBLY 
WITH COD. 




December Time 
For Christmas 
Fund Offering 



Christmas is an especilly appropriate 
time for us in the United Church of Christ 
to remember those in our church family 
who have served us long and well — 
retired ministers and their spouses. 

One way we can remember those who 
have given us years of leadership is 
through the Christmas Fund of the UCC 
Pension Boards. In addition to providing 
such Christmas remembrances, the Fund 
also helps our ministers — active or 
retired — who face unexpected needs or 
emergency situations. 

This year's theme for the Christmas 
Fund is "Do justly, love mercy, and walk 
humbly with God," from the Book of 
Micah. These words from the Old Testa- 
ment prophet have been the charter of our 
actions and service of God's servants over 
the centuries. 

Special Christmas Fund brochures and 
offering envelopes have been forwarded to 
each church. Please plan to give generous- 
ly. 

The Christmas Fund provides an oppor- 
tunity to say "thank you" to retired 
pastors and their spouses for their many 
years of devoted service to the church and 
the people it represents. 



Church Shoulders 
Assumed 

In March, 1981, several religious lead- 
ers, including clergy from our United 
Church of Christ, testified before a U.S. 
Congressional Subcommittee. They testi- 
fied to the continued need for nutritional 
programs at a time when proposed govern- 
ment budget cuts threatened to curtail 
many such programs. 

The members of the subcommittee gave 
serious attention to the testimony of the 
church leaders, but then pointed out that 
budget cuts should be expected. Not only 
that, but to the amazement of some of the 
leaders themselves, one legislator on the 
subcommittee said, "The burden of contin- 
uing to feed the hungry lies on the 
shoulders of the members of the nation's 
churches!" 

This astonishing conclusion illustrates 
well the challenge that rests upon the 
church to more vigorously support ecu- 
menical efforts to empower the hungry, to 
pursue systemic and legislative approach- 
es to the issue of hunger, and to assist a 
variety of hunger-alleviating projects in 
the U.S. today. 

This we can do by our contributions to 
the UCC Hunger Action Fund, as well as by 
our direction action in local communities. 
For more information, write Hunger 
Action Fund, 475 Riverside Drive, 16th 
Floor, NY, NY 10115. 

— Atlanta Council UCC Newsletter 



Toward Creative 
And Simple Living 

Last night you had a dream in which you 
sat at a table enjoying a sumptuous meal 
when, suddenly, you realized that the 
people sitting around you had only rice and 
water to eat. You asked your neighbor, 
"Who are all these people? Why are they 
being served only rice and water?" And 
your neighbor replied, "Haven't you seen 
them before? They have always been 
there!" 

We in the developed nations of the world 

comprise 28% of the world's population, 

[Continued on Page 3 J 




Bon Offers 
Sponsor Program 

Elon Home for Children, a United 
Church health and welfare agency, located 
in Elon County, N.C. is now offering 
churches, church groups and individuals a 
new way to help support the Home's 
program and the children it serves. 

Called the "Sponsor Program," indivi- 
duals or groups are invited to participate 
for a year (Oct. 1 - Sept. 30) in one of four 
ways: 

—Allowance Sponsors would help provide 
regular spending money for the boys and 
girls. A suggested amount is $5 per month 
or $60 per year. 

—Clothing Sponsors would help furnish 
clothing for a child. The clothing allow- 
ance guide is $20 per month or $240 per 
year. 

—Birthday and Christmas Gift Sponsors 
would make certain a child is provided for 
on both occasions with a gift of $35 per 
year. 

—Special Needs Sponsors would be en- 
couraged to give $50 per month or $600 per 
year which would provide for school 
supplies, medical/dental needs for which 
other resources are not available, field 
trips and camp fees. . 

For brochures further outlining the 
Sponsor Program, write: Elon Home for 
Children, P.O. Box 157, Elon College, N.C. 
27244. 



The Final Word 

"I refuse to accept the cynical notion 
that nation after nation must spiral down a 
militaristic stairway into the hell of a 
nuclear destruction. I believe the unarmed 
truth and unconditional love will have the 
final word in reality." 

— Martin Luther King 



CONFERENCE CORNER 

REV. WARREN BLANKENHORN 

Around this time of year most all of our 
churches involve themselves in that 
process which we know as Stewardship — 
the process of enlisting financial support 
for the church's ministries in the coming 
year. 

Toward that end I am reminded of a 
story by Halford Luccock who said, "You 
remember that among the Franks whole 
armies were sometimes given baptism at 
one stroke, and many warriors went into 
the water with their right hands held high, 
so that they did not get wet. Then they 
could say, "This hand has never been 
baptized,' and they could swing their 
battle axes just as freely as ever. The 
modern counterpart of that partial bap- 
tism is seen in many people who have been 
baptized, all except their pocket-books. 
They hold these high out of the water." 

Faith isn't something you just feel or 
think about or talk about. Faith is contin- 
ually demonstrating God's presence in our 
lives by giving of ourselves and our 
resources to others. 

This is often easy — and convenient to 
forget. Therefore, it is doubly important 
that we seek to baptize those wallets in our 
stewardship giving this year! 



COCU To Celebrate 
20th Anniversary 

COCU, the nation's largest-ever church 
union effort, will celebrate its 20th anni- 
versary in Louisville, KY this March, its 
leaders determined to have the 10 partici- 
pating denominations demonstrate their 
commitment to each other in significant 
ways even before any union takes place. 

The Consultation on Church Union 
(COCU) will bring representatives to- 
gether of some 22 million American 
Christians at Louisville's Gait House 
March 9-12 to usher in the movement's 
third decade. 

COCU began in 1962, two years after a 
famous sermon by Presbyterian Eugene 
Carson Blake urging four major denomin- 
ations to join forces in a new church. 

A first draft of a union plan prepared in 
the early 1970s ran into snags, but the 
churches feel they have broad agreement 
on faith, worship and sacramental issues, 
and each has taken action to recognize the 
others' members. 

The March meeting will hear a "State of 
Union" address by the Rev. Dr. Gerald F. 
Moede, COCU's secretary in Princeton, 
N. J., and will debate the idea of a covenant 
as well as the earmarks of a covenant rela- 
tionship. 

-2- 




DR. ROY STAUFFER of the Christian 
Church [ Disciples of Christ] 

Ala.-Tenn. Clergy 

Explore UCC- 
Disciples Merger 

Nearly 40 clergy persons, representing 
the Alabama-Tennessee Association of the 
United Church of Christ and the Tennessee 
Region of the Christian Church (Disciples 
of Christ), gathered at Bethany Hills 
Campground, White Bluff, TN on October 
19-20 to explore on a local level the conver- 
sations concerning possible further merg- 
er between the UCC and the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ). 

Under the leadership of Dr. David 
Beebe, pastor of Chattanooga Pilgrim 
UCC, and Dr. Roy Stauffer of the Christian 
Church, discussions were held on the 
similarities and differences in understand- 
ings of the nature of the church, ordination 
of ministers, and celebration of baptism 
and communion. 

During the next two years further 
dialogue on the possibility of merger has 
been scheduled for lay members of local 
churches, throughout the Southeast Con- 
ference. Representative UCC and Disci- 
ples congregations have been paired and 
have been requested to hold a series of 
meetings utilizing a study packet entitled 
"The Covenant." Reactions to the meet- 
ings, which will be held throughout the 
country, will be forwarded to the head- 
quarters of each denomination to see if 
there is sufficient "grass roots" support to 
seriously warrant formal merger negotia- 
tions. 

Churches which are interested in provid- 
ing input are invited to do so. For further 
copies of the study packet, write: Chris- 
tian Board of Publication, P.O. Box 179, St. 
Louis, MO 63166. 



Pilgrimage Church 
Moves 

Pilgrimage UCC, a new church start 
located in Marietta, GA, has moved out of 
the bowling alley and into a church build- 
ing. 

Having outgrown the space they were 
using at he Spray berry Bowling Lanes, 
Pilgrimage UCC moved this past Septem- 
ber into the historic Holly Springs Metho- 
dist Church located on Holly Springs Road 
in Marietta. The church building was no 
longer in use and available for rent. 

"Genuinely excited" is how church pas- 
tor Ira Chace responded to the move. 
While now located in a church building, 
Pilgrimage continues to plan for fund rais- 
ing and construction of its own facilities on 
its own property. 

That will be the final step for a church 
that has truly made a pilgrimage — begin- 
ning in a pizza parlor, moving to a bowling 
alley and now in a temporary church set- 
ting! 

CURT'S NUGGETS 

From the desk of Curtis Schumacher, 
Pleasant Hill, Tennessee: 

Some people put as little as possible into 
life and hope to hit the jack pot. 



Creative Living . . cont'd 

yet we consume 84% of the world's energy. 
We own 92% of the world's automobiles. 
We possess 80% of the world's income. And 
we eat far more than our fair share of the 
world's food! 

A new booklet, Creative and Simple 
Living, prepared recently by a UCC con- 
gregation in Seattle, WA, provides one way 
in which you can do something to help 
redress this imbalance. 

"Simplified living," the booklet notes, 
"is a matter of ethical Christian steward- 
ship in this world of imbalanced and 
inequitable use of resources. Simplified 
living is a necessary response to the 
present and future world resource crisis." 

"To ensure food for all," the booklet con- 
tinues, "we should decrease the amount 
we eat, substitute vegetable protein for 
animal protein, minimize food waste, and 
add to home food supplies by farming and 
gardening on available land." Specific 
suggestions follow for acquiring food, 
changing eating habits, planning meals, 
keeping and conserving food, and affecting 
corporate and governmental food policies. 

Individual copies of this booklet (which 
may be duplicated locally) are available 
for a donation of $1.00 to cover shipping 
cost from: Lifestyle Committee, Univer- 
sity Congregational Church, UCC, Box 
5687, Seattle, WA 98105. 




Part of the large crowd attending First E&R's 90th birthday. 

Nashville First Celebrates 
It's Ninetieth Birthday 



First Evangelical & Reformed Church, 
UCC in Nashville, TN celebrated its 90th 




Pastor David Beebe [ I ] speaks with mem- 
bers of Pilgrim UCC, Chattanooga, TN. 

-3- 



birthday in special services held at the 
church on October 4, 1981. 

Begun by Swiss immigrants in 1891, the 
church's first building was constructed in 
1893. In 1952 the church moved to its 
present location and worshipped in what 
is now the parsonage until the new sanctu- 
ary was completed in 1955. In 1969 a new 
educational building was added when 
membership passed the 200 mark. 

The October 4 "Celebration of Our 
Heritage" included a morning worship 
service followed by a Swiss-German 
dinner highlighted by the performance of a 
German folk dancing group. The church's 
old Bibles, hymnals and church records 
were on display. 

The church's pastor is Dr. Lelan McRey- 
nolds. 



Insurance Company cont'd 



says the Connecticut Mutual Life Report 
on American Values in the '80 's — The 
Impact of Belief, a nationwide survey 
that the insurer commissioned "to probe 
for the basic beliefs and core values of a 
diverse cross sampling of Americans." 

The random sampling of the public and 
its leaders examined these key sectors: 
religion in America, involvement and 
belief in the American political system; 
local community, moral and political 
issues; survival of the American family; 
survival of the American work ethic; the 
search for leaders; and implications of 
what was learned. 

Some of the major highlights of the 
survey: 

—The percentage of religious Americans 
is the same as in the past, but beliefs 
appear much more important to them than 
before. 

—The level of religious commitment pre- 
dicts individual attitudes and behavior far 
better than traditional distinctions of race, 
sex, age, income, education, occupational 
status or political persuasion. 
—Highly religious people believe more in 
their community, family, work and the 
American political and social system than 
do the least religious. 



Hugs Called 
Good Medicine 

A California social scientist believes 
hugging is good medicine. It transfers 
energy and gives the person hugged an 
emotional boost. 

"You need four hugs a day for survival, 
eight for maintenance and 12 for growth," 
Virginia Satir said in the April issue of 
Seventeen magazine. 

She said a hug makes people feel good 
because "the skin is the largest organ we 
have and it needs a great deal of care. A 
hug can cover a lot of skin area and give 
the message that you tare." 

It is also a form of communication the 
scientist says, because it can say things 
you don't have words for. 

And "the nicest thing about a hug is that 
you usually can't give one without getting 
one." 

Vintage 



Roman women powdered their faces 
with ground white lead and colored hair 
with imported dyes. They were 
convinced, it seems, from their hair 
dyes, that blondes had more fun. 



— Religious Americans also are more 
active in community and politics, out-vot- 
ing the least religious, according to their 
responses, by more than three to two on a 
percentage basis. 

— Religious current throughout America 
transcends all social and political bound- 
aries and appears to be far more than a 
reaction to such visible and politically 



active organizations as the "Moral Majori- 
ty." 

—Of the nine leadership groups surveyed, 
all except religious and business leaders 
were found to be out of step with the 
general public on most issues. 

For further information on the surve: 
results, write to: A.M. Best Company, 
Oldwick, N.J. 08858. 



Statement of ownership, management and circulation 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION 

tRtduirtd by 39 U S C 3685; 



TLE OF PUBLICATION 

SOUTHEAST NEWS 



|8 ,0 



j .HEOUENCr of issue ^-monthly Aug-Sept, Dec-Jan 
Monthly: Oct, Nov, Feb-July inclusive 



2 DATE OF FILING 

9/16/81 



COMPLETE HAILING ADDRESS OF KNOWN OFFICE OF PUBLICATION (Slrtl. Clly. Count,. SWl tnd ZIP Codt) /Not prlnlfl) 

2676 Clairmont Rd., NE , Atlanta, GA 30329 DeKalb County 



' 5 COMPLETE MAILING ADORESS OF THE HEADQUARTERS OR GENERAL BUSINESS OFFICES OF THE PUBLISHERS INol prlnltn) 
I 

! same as above 



6 FULL NAMES AND COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS OF PUBLISHER. EDI TOR. AND MANAGING EDITOR (Thli lltm MUST NOT bt ofink) 

publisher iN.mt mo Compitf Miiimo Adam,* 2676 Clairmont Rd . , NE , Atlanta, GA 30329 
SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 



COITOR INtmt tnd Complttl Milling Addrtii) 

Emmett 0. Floyd, 2676 Clairmont Rd. Atlanta, GA 30329 



MANAGING EDITOR INtmt tnd Compltlt Milling Addittl) 

Stephen C. Gray , 700 Bresslyn Rd. Nashville, TN 37205 



! 7 OWNER II owntd by • coiportllon. Ill ntmi tnd laatm mail bt iltltd tnd alio Immtdltltly In 
hdldtn owning or holding I pttctnl o< "ion of roc»l tmounl of Hock. If nof owntd by t coiportllon. I 
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publlctllon li publllhtd by t nonprofit orgtnUtllon. Ill ntmt tnd idoroil mull bt Iltltd.) (Iltm mull Be compltltd) 



COMPLETE MAILING AOORESS 



Southeast Conference, United Church of 



2676 Clairmont Rd.,NE Atlanta, GA 30329 



Christ 



«. KNOWN BONOhOlOEHS MORTGAGEES' AND OTHER SECURITY "OiOERS OWN.NG OR HOLDING • PERCENT OH MORE OF 
TOTAL AMOUN' OF BONDS MORTGAGES OR OTHER SECL'R'TiES (II thtrt trt nont. 10 inn; 



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EXTENT AND NATURE OF CIRCULATION 



TOTAL NO. COPIES (Nil ami nun) 



AVERAGE NO COPIES EACH 

ISSUE OURiNG PRECEOING 

'! MONTHS 



855 



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ISSUE PUBLISHED NEAREST TO 

FILING DATE 



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(See Instruction on i 




PILGRIM UCC, Chattanooga, TN 

Around The Conference 
Pilgrim UCC, Chattanooga 

From the Atlantic Ocean to the Missis- 
sippi River, from the Gulf of Mexico to the 
mountains of Tennessee, the Southeast 
Conference covers a broad expanse of 
territory. Contained within her boundaries 
are some 120 churches — widely dispersed 
— widely diverse in heritage and religious 
expression — and yet united in the convic- 
tion that the churches of Jesus Christ 
"may all be one." 

A church that has historically provided 
some of the strongest Conference support 
has been Pilgrim Congregational Church, 
UCC, located in Chattanooga, TN. One of 
two UCC churches was organized in 
December, 1914 out of a gathering of 
people interested in forming a Congrega- 

The Southeast News 

Second Class Postage Paid at 
Atlanta, Georgia 30359 

Publication Number 504480 

Published monthly October and 

November; February to July, inclusive; 

bi-monthly August-September and 

December-January, by and for 

the churches of the 

SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE 
The United Church of Christ 

2676 Clairmont Rd., Atlanta, Ga. 30329 
Telephone (404) 633-5655 

Subscription Rate — $2.00 Per Year 

Printed by The Roanoke Leader 
Roanoke, Alabama 

Vol.32 November, 1981 No. 9 

POSTMASTER: Send Form 3579 to 
P.O. Box 29833, Atlanta, Ga. 30359 



Services Held For 
Priscilla Chase 

Priscilla Chase, 80, died October 12, 1981 
at the Wharton Nursing Home in Pleasant 
Hill, TN. She had been a resident of the 
Uplands retirement community in Plea- 
sant Hill since 1969. 

Born in 1901 in Rocky Hill, Connecticut, 
Miss Chase, following graduation in 1923 
from Middlebury College, Middlebury, 
VT, was commissioned as an Extension 
Worker for the Board of Home Missions of 
the Congregational Churches. 

Her first assignment in educational field 
work was with churches in the area now 
encompassed by the Southeast Confer- 
ence. In particular, Miss Chase served the 
Deer Lodge Church in Deer Lodge, TN as 
well as a number of churches in Georgia. 
Following a term as Minister of Chris- 
tian Education for the Ohio Conference of 
Congregational Christian Churches, Miss 
Chase served as Director of the Order 
Department of the Missionary Education 
Movement, which during her tenure be- 
came part of the National Council of 
Churches in the United States, based in 
New York City. 

A memorial service was held for Miss 
Chase at the Community Church of Plea- 
sant Hill on October 29. Persons wishing to 
make memorial contributions are asked to 
forward them to Uplands Retirement 
Center, Pleasant Hill, TN 38578. 



tional Church in central Chattanooga. 

After meeting in a theater, the congrega- 
tion built a beautiful colonial building 
which was dedicated in 1922. The corner- 
stone of the new church building was an 
old millstone from the Congregational 
Brainerd Indian Mission which was form- 
erly located in Chattanooga. 

Under the leadership of Rev. Arnold 
Slater, now Pastor Emeritus, the congre- 
gation outgrew its facilities resulting in the 
re-location of the church in 1959 to its 
present modern structure. 

With some 370 members, the church 
supports a "full service" ministry, em- 
ploying a full-time pastor, an office secre- 
tary, organist-choir director and part-time 
Christian education enabler. The church 
building is used for numerous community 
groups from the Mental Health Associa- 
tion to the garden clubs to the Council on 
Adoptable Children. Members of the 
church are identified in the community as 
leaders in progressive civic issues. 
Several members of Pilgrim have held 
national posts in the United Church Of 
Christ. 

Supporting a full church program, Pil- 
grim Church still stands in its heritage of 
an open faith, wedding honest scholarshiop 
with concern for justice in society. True to 
-5- 



SPEAKING OF YOUTH 

For youth leaders as well as youth there 
are three publications that you might like 
to include in your library: 
—"Findings from the 1980 National Youth 
Event Survey" — excellent research data 
that better help in understanding what 
youth think and feel about themselves, 
their families, the culture in which they 
live and the church. 

—"Bound Together in Faith," New Con- 
versations, Winter '80-'81 — a series of 12 
articles written by persons like Andrew 
Young, Avery Post and Randy Furushima 
about the National Youth Event and differ- 
ent aspects of youth ministry and culture. 
—"Youth Magazine — an award-winning 
monthly publication of the United Church 
of Christ, excellent for junior and senior 
high youth. 
To order any of these materials, write: 
UCBHM, 132 West 13th Street, N.Y., 
N.Y. 10001. 



Church building grants and loans total- 
ing close to $1.66 million were approved in 
October by the United Church of Christ's 
Board for Homeland Ministries. The 
national church agency's board of direc- 
tors also allocated $550,500 to aid in the 
establishment or renewal of 15 churches. 
The grants of $52,000 and loans of $1,607,500 
will be used for building efforts of 17 
churches throughout the country. 

Florida congregations will receive the 
greatest share of building funds. The 
second highest allotment was made to a 
Piano, TX congregation. 

Additional loans were also made to 
churches in California, Wisconsin, North 
Carolina, Nebraska, Indiana, Ohio, New 
York, Michigan, and South Dakota. 

its covenant, the church continues to strive 
"toward the progress of knowledge, the 
promotion of justice, the reign of peace, 
and the realization of human brother- 
hood." 







j$v & <j £$• 



Birthday cake for First E&R. 



NEWS AND NOTES 



Bonanza United Church of Christ, locat- 
ed in Jonesboro, GA, will celebrate its 15th 
Anniversary with a Homecoming celebra- 
tion on November 15. 

****************************************** 

Fairfield Glade Community Church, 
Fairfield Glade, TN, has called Rev. Wolf- 
gang Koehler as its new pastor and 
teacher. Rev. Koehler is presently pastor 
of St. John's UCC, Monroe, Wisconsin 
where he has served since 1968. Rev. 
Koehler will follow Rev. Marion Mansell, 
Fairfield Glade's founding pastor, who 
recently retired. 



Rev. Paul Johnson, pastor of First Con- 
gregational Church, UCC in Montgomery, 
AL, was recently interviewed in a special 
feature article for The Montgomery Ad- 
vertiser. The article highlighted First 
Church and the work of the UCC. 
****************************************** 

Pilgrim UCC, Birmingham, AL, will be 
demonstrating their heritage on Thanks- 
giving Sunday, November 22. All members 
of the congregation have been asked to 
make and wear original Pilgrim costumes 
and attend a worship service duplicating 
that celebrated by the Plymouth colony. 



Brooklawn Children's Home, the oldest 
Health & Welfare Agency of the United 
Church of Christ, is offering a special cook- 
book in honor of its 130th Anniversary. The 
cost of the cookbook if $5.00 plus $1.50 for 
handling and shipping. Write: P.O. Box 
32336, Louisville, KY 40232. 
****************************************** 

Interested in continuing education for 
yourself or your pastor? Write to: The 
Center for Professional Development in 
Ministry, Lancaster Theological Semin- 
ary, 555 West James Street, Lancaster, PA 
17603. 



****************************************** ****************************************** ****************************************** 



Rev. Ira Chace was installed on October 
18 as pastor and teacher of Pilgrimage 
United Church of Christ, a new church 
start located in Marietta, GA. 

****************************************** 

Barriers, the Access Game, is a game 
especially designed to show the successes 
and frustrations that face disabled citizens 
daily as they try to maneuver through the 
barrier-ridden environment. Barriers can 
be ordered from: Message Management 
Consultants, Box 20010, Indianapolis, IN 
46220 for $8.00 plus $1.25 for postage and 
handling. 



New( ) Renewal ( ) 



Name 



Address (Street, Route # and/or Box #) 



The United Church of Christ, along with 
14 other religious bodies with congrega- 
tions in the state of Georgia recently joined 
together to create "The Georgia Christian 
Council." The purpose of the council is to 
facilitate dialogue as well as coordinate 
programs for persons in need. 
****************************************** 

Susan Lackey and Mitchell Wilder were 
married at Church of the Savior, UCC in 
Knoxville, TN on August 29. Susan is the 
daughter of the church's pastor, Rev. John 
Lackey. 



City 



State 



Zip Code 



[FEB. 1982 THRU 
DEC. 1982-JAN. 1983] 

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"Commitment and Hope" is the theme 
of the "Ecumenical Event" being sponsor- 
ed by the National Council of Churches 
November 5-7 in Cleveland, OH. The meet- 
ing will highlight the goals and commit- 
ment of the ecumenical movement. 
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Want to help Appalachia Habitat for 
Humanity? They are in desperate need of: 
a desk and desk chair for the office, a 
cassette tape player and 35mm camera 
and a small movie screen. If you can 
respond, write to: MarkFrey, P.O. Box 14, 
Robbins, TN 37852. 
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"Criminal Justice Issues" is a publica- 
tion of the Commission for Racial Justice 
of the United Church of Christ. If you 
would like to subscribe to this publication, 
write to: Commission for Racial Justice, 
105 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
10016. 
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The ministry of the Morgan-Scott Pro- 
ject is featured in the 1981-83 Biennial 
Report of the United Church Board for 
Homeland Ministries. 



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